Community

Congregation Anshai Emeth

309-691-3323       5614 N. University St., Peoria, IL 61614

Around 1847 the first Jewish settlers began arriving in Peoria. Their number had grown enough by 1863 that they formed the Anshai Emeth congregation and purchased the old Presbyterian Church on Fulton between Adams and Jefferson. In 1874 new arrivals from Eastern Europe plus others who favored a more Orthodox approach formed the Congregation Beth Israel and purchased the church on Seventh Street near Franklin that had originally been erected by the Central Christian Church in 1855. By 1886 the two congregations decided to re-merge and the Beth Israel property was sold and the proceeds turned over to Anshai Emeth. In 1896 the temple on Fulton was destroyed by fire, so a new temple was erected in 1898 on the corner of Monroe and Hancock Streets. This temple, constructed of the same Lake Superior sandstone used in the City Hall building, served Anshai Emeth until 1967 when the congregation moved to a new facility. The building on Monroe was sold to the Christian Assembly Church.

 

Congregation Agudas Achim

309-692-4848       5614 N. University St., Peoria, IL 61614

In the second half of the 1800s, the Orthodox Jews who could not be accommodated by the Reform congregation continued to grow in numbers, so they organized the Agudas Achim congregation in 1897 and purchased the old Cumberland Presbyterian Church on Monson Street at a cost of $3,000 for the land and building and $1,200 for improvements. In 1912 a new temple was constructed a half block away at the corner of Monson and Sixth Streets. The old site subsequently housed several other churches, then served for many years as the Musicians Union Hall, and recently has been remodeled and is occupied by First Capital Bank. In 1958 a new temple was built near the corner of Sheridan Road and War Memorial Drive and served as the home of Agudas Achim until the congregation sold the building to the New Hope International Church. Agudas Achim now holds Orthodox services at the Anshai Emeth temple on University.

 

Chabad of Peoria

309-692-2250       804 Country Meadows Lane, Peoria, IL 61614

The origins of today’s Chabad-Lubavitch organization can be traced to the early 1940’s when the sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn of righteous memory (1880-1950), appointed his son-in-law and later successor, Rabbi Menachem Mendel, to head the newly-founded educational and social service arms of the movement. Motivated by his profound love for every Jew and spurred by his boundless optimism and self-sacrifice, the Rebbe set into motion a dazzling array of programs, services and institutions to serve every Jew. Today 4,000 full-time emissary families apply 250 year-old principles and philosophy to direct more than 3,300 institutions (and a workforce that numbers in the tens of thousands) dedicated to the welfare of the Jewish people worldwide.

 

Jewish Federation of Peoria

309-689-0063       2000 Pioneer Pkwy., Suite 10B, Peoria, IL 61614

The federation’s mission is to serve the Jewish people locally, in Israel, and throughout the world through coordinated fundraising, community-wide programming, social services, and social-cultural-educational activities. The JFP falls under the Jewish Federations of North America. JFNA represents and serves 155 Federations and 400 Jewish communities across North America, reflecting the values of social justice and human rights that define the Jewish people. In addition the JFP is a member of theJewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA), our national community relations organization.

 

Peoria Hebrew Day School

309-692-2821       5614 N. University St., Peoria, IL 61614

The Peoria Hebrew Day School strives to create a family community of learners who value lifelong study, respect human diversity and are able to make informed choices about their lives. Our goal is to provide a stimulating and nurturing environment, encouraging each student to feel positive about him/herself and others while preparing each student to be knowledgeable, caring and contributing members of the Jewish people, the United States of America and the world. As a community day school we seek to imbue our students with a love for G_d, Torah and Israel and teach respect for diverse viewpoints. Our unique program endeavors to integrate Judaic and core academic studies, incorporating the highest values of Judaism and American democracy.